Hot air

One tool. All sorts of jobs.

All just hot air? Yes. But it's incredible what it can be used for! This page shows you how versatile hot air tools can be in everyday use. Be inspired by our top 10 red-hot tips on the subject of hot air. Have fun trying them out!

From A to Z, from adhesion to zinc

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Adjusting

the position of bonded workpieces is a problem with hot-melt adhesives, particularly where large surfaces are involved. Hot air can significantly extend the "open time" of adhesives, making it possible to carry out precision adjustments.

Activating

adhesives with hot air is always recommended whenever you want to stick items over large surfaces or remove anything sticking to a large surface. When hot-melt gluing, hot air gives the glue a longer "open time", also ensuring good adhesion on large surfaces.

Anti-drumming mats

not only let little children sleep in the back of the car, they are also a worthwhile investment for drivers who clock up high mileages. Particularly at low temperatures, the engine-noise deadening material is often hard or stiff, making it difficult to fit. Hot air makes anti-drumming mats pliant in next to no time. This way, they are easy to mould around bends and fit into corners.

Burning off

old coats of paint and varnish has so far been a problem: naked flames are dangerous and can easily scorch wood or materials close by. Hot air now makes it easy to soften paint and thoroughly remove it with a paint spatula or paint scraper. Specially shaped scraper blades are available for corners and profiles (see accessories). Once the paint has been removed, you should rub the surface down with fine-grain sandpaper before applying a new coat. (see "Paint stripping")

Bundling cables

When it comes to cabling work, a hot air tool is perfect for bundling cables. Using a reflector nozzle to generate even heat is recommended here.

Bonded joints

can be loosened quickly and neatly with hot air. Whether you want to remove decorative foils from a door, edgeband from furniture or take up PVC flooring, the hot air tool fitted with a surface nozzle helps you to finish the job in next to no time!

Bumpers

and spoilers are in most cases made of plastic. Accident damage is quickly repaired with the hot air tool and, if needed, the appropriate welding rod. (see "Welding plastic")

Bending

wood, plastic or copper can also be achieved with hot air. Particularly in model-making, it is often necessary to bend pieces of wood into a specific shape. To do this, the wood is soaked and bent in a wet state and, if necessary, clamped in place. It is then dried with hot air.

  • Hot air makes plastic pipes or panels supple, enabling them to be shaped or moulded in any way.
  • Copper can also be bent by steadily heating it. Please bear in mind that metal is a good heat conductor, so be careful not to burn yourself.  

Bitumen

is often used for repairing roofs in the form of bitumen roof felt or coating. This material rapidly turns into a liquid state with hot air, allowing it to quickly penetrate joints and cracks.